A MUSEUM OF EARLY AND HISTORIC MICROPHONES
W1TP MUSEUM OF TELEGRAPH AND SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS: http://w1tp.com

(I am always looking for equipment or photographs for the museum.)

Click on photographs then click "GO BACK" to return to text.

A COLLECTION OF EARLY AND MODERN MICROPHONES:

Microphones convert sound waves into electrical voltages. They were first used with early telephones and then radio transmitters and have evolved through a number of major changes to the high quality instruments of today. Collecting microphones can be very interesting and some representative microphones are included in this web page along with a reference to an excellent article on early microphones.
-- A Table-Top Collection of Miscelaneous Microphones: (42KB)

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

1. EARLY TELEPHONE MICROPHONES:
2. EARLY RADIO MICROPHONES: ( < 1920's - 1930's )
3. RADIO MICROPHONES: ( 1930's - 1950's )
4. RADIO MICROPHONES: ( 1950's - Present )
5. MISCELANEOUS MICROPHONE-RELATED EXHIBITS:
6. REFERENCES:
7. POSSIBLE PLACES TO HAVE MICROPHONES REPAIRED AND RE-RIBBONED:

1. EARLY TELEPHONE MICROPHONES:

0020 Bell's Original Telephone Microphone: (6KB)
0020a High resolution photo of above: (148KB)
This is Bell's original liquid transmitter from a set of Bell Laboratories photographs in the Ron Christianson Telephone Collection.
0021 Reproduction of Bell's Original Telephone Microphone: (9KB)
0021a High resolution photo of above reproduction: (58KB)
This reproduction is in the Ron Christianson Telephone Collection.
0022 Another reproduction, Dated 1876 on the base.(37KB) Many reproductions of Bell's original Liquid Transmitter have been made. Since it is a simple design, it is very hard to tell the difference between the original and the reproductions as you can see from these photographs.
0023 Bell's Iron Box Transmitter: (8KB)
0023a High resolution photo of above: (100KB)
0024 Bell's Iron Box Transmitter With Thumper: (12KB)
0024a High resolution photo of above: (214KB)
0025 Bell's First Commercial Transmitter: (10KB)
0025a High resolution photo of above: (173KB)
These are all from a set of Bell Laboratories photographs in the Ron Christianson Telephone Collection.
0026 Extremely early pre-electric "String Phone":(12KB)
0026 Another view of the Extremely early pre-electric "String Phone":(14KB)
0026b Another view of the Extremely early pre-electric "String Phone":(17KB)
0026c Another view of the Extremely early pre-electric "String Phone":(14KB)

Ron is always looking for interesting telephones and parts. If you would like to contact him about his telephone collection or telephones that you might want information about, you may email him at: bngholio@internetcds.com
or telephone him at (541) 592-4123.
Here is a photograph of part of his huge collection:
Part of Ron Christianson's collection: (23KB)
High resolution view of part of his collection: (66KB)

GO TO THE ENTIRE: RON CHRISTIANSON TELEPHONE MUSEUM:

0040 EARLY RAILROAD DISPATCHER'S TELEPHONE/MICROPHONE ON SCISSORS MOUNT:(16KB)This telephone/microphone was mounted above a railroad dispatcher's desk so that it would not take up space needed by the telegraph apparatus.


2. EARLY RADIO MICROPHONES: ( < 1920's - 1930's )

45 EXCEPTIONALLY EARLY GERMAN CARBON MICROPHONE WITH WOODEN DIAPHRAGM:(37KB)This is an extremely early, 19th century German carbon microphone. There are three carbon cylinders and the diaphragm is made of a very light, thin wood. The manufacturer is not known.

50 WESTERN ELECTRIC CARBON MICROPHONE Circa 1920s. (27KB) Early microphones such as this were mounted in springs to isolate them from local vibration. This microphone is mounted in a special stand which is similar in design to the stand used to support Western Electric loudspeakers. Unlike the loudspeaker stand, however, it has no holes through the rim and a few other details of the casting are different.

60 EARLY KELLOGG HAM RADIO STATION MICROPHONE:(6KB) This early hand-held carbon microphone was used in a 1920's vintage Ham Radio Station in New York.

60 EARLY S. H. COUCH HAM RADIO STATION MICROPHONE:(8KB)This early desk-mounted carbon microphone was used in a 1920's vintage Ham Radio Station. The label reads: Made by S. H. Couch Inc., Norfolk Downs, MA.

100 ELECTRO-VOICE MODEL 50 MICROPHONE IN UNIVERSAL STAND Circa 1920s.(16KB) This microphone is a combination of an Elecro-Voice Model 50 Carbon Microphone Element mounted in an Universal Desk stand.

102 UNIVERSAL MODEL BB MICROPHONE:(9KB) This microphone consists of an Universal Model BB double-button carbon microphone mounted in an Universal Desk Stand. The stand is equipped with covers which can hide the microphone element from view. During the early days of broadcasting many singers and performers were terrified by the sight of the microphone and it was often hidden behind a cover like this one or even hidden from view by a piece of silk material draped over the microphone. This is the same microphone model which was used in the original ''Wizard of Oz'' movie.
102a An inside view of the Universal Microphone:(17KB)
102b Another inside view of the Universal Microphone:(15KB)
102c Another inside view of the Universal Microphone:(9KB)

105 KODEL REPRODUCER / SPEAKER(15KB) Although this item looks like a microphone similar to number 100, it is actually a speaker/reproducer manufactured by Kodel Radio Corporation of Cincinatti, Ohio around 1925. Mr. Ogden of Kodel is documented in Alan Douglas' ''Radio Manufacturers of the 1920's'' as owner/operator of Radio Station WKRC. (My thanks to collector George Freeman for taking the time to email this information.)

110 AMERICAN CARBON MICROPHONE Circa 1920s.(20KB)

120 UNIVERSAL CARBON MICROPHONE Circa 1920s.(14KB) The labels on the base and element read: Universal Microphone. Inglewood, Calif.

125 UNIDENTIFIED CARBON DESK MICROPHONE Circa 1920's:(13KB)
125a Another view of the Unidentified Microphone: (14KB)

130 CONTINENTAL CARBON MICROPHONE Circa 1920's. (11KB)This Continental Microphone carries a label which reads: Continental Microphone, Inglewood, California.
130a Another view of the Continental Carbon Microphone:(12KB)

150 REISZ-MICROPHONE Circa 1920s.(26KB)


3. RADIO MICROPHONES: ( 1930's - 1950's )

400 PHILMORE DYNA-MIC Circa 1930s.(27KB)

410 GLOBE DESK MICROPHONE:(10KB) This is an inexpensively made desk microphone similar to the Philmore Dyna-Mic shown above. On the back of the microphone, it is labeled: GLOBE TROTTER, Cleveland, Ohio.

425 BRUNO 3K4 RIBBON VELOCITY MICROPHONE Circa 1930s.(16KB)

450 BRUNO VDHF RIBBON VELOCITY MICROPHONE Circa 1930s.(32KB)

500 ELECTRO-VOICE V2 AND MINI-V1 RIBBON VELOCITY MICS Circa 1940's.(35KB)
501 A closer view of the Electro-Voice V1 miniature ribbon microphone:(5KB)
502 A closer view of the Electro-Voice V2 ribbon microphone:(6KB)
503 An Unusual Brown Electro-Voice V2 ribbon microphone:(8KB)
503a A closer view of the Brown V2 ribbon microphone:(8KB)

520 ELECTRO-VOICE MODEL 644 MICROPHONE:(9KB)

540 ELECTRO-VOICE MODEL 664 DYNAMIC CARDIOID MICROPHONE:(8KB)

560 ELECTRO-VOICE MODEL 726 CARDYNE 1 MICROPHONE:(9KB)The label reads: Electro Voice CARDYNE 1 Model 726. B-4059. Buchanan, Michigan.

630 RCA MODEL 74 (44-Junior) PROTOTYPE:(7KB) This is an early version of the Model 74 Ribbon Velocity Microphone which is also known as the Model 44-Junior since it looks like a miniature version of the Model 44.

635 RCA MODEL 74 (44-Junior) MICROPHONE:(9KB) This microphone was widely used in recording and PA applications.

650 RCA MICROPHONE Circa 1950s.(11KB)

850 AMERICAN D9AT HIGH IMPEDANCE MICROPHONE Circa 1930s.(18KB)

900 UNUSUAL AMPERITE RBHG RIBBON VELOCITY MICROPHONE:(8KB)This is a very unusual Amperite model.
900a Another view of the Amperite RBHG:(9KB)

1050 SHURE MODEL 55 "UNIDYNE" MICROPHONE. Circa 1950s.(15KB)

1100 SHURE MODEL 555 MICROPHONE Circa 1950s. (10KB)

1200 VERY UNUSUAL TURNER VELOCITY MICROPHONE:(7KB)
1200a Another view of the Unusual Turner Microphone: (7KB)
1200b Another view of the Unusual Turner Microphone: (12KB)
1200c Another view of the Unusual Turner Microphone: (13KB)

1550 WESTERN ELECTRIC MODEL 633a ''Salt Shaker'' MICROPHONE ON CANADIAN DISPATCHER'S DESK STAND: (10KB)This is the classic and widely used Western Electric Model 633 Dynamic Microphone which is nicknamed the ''salt shaker'' as a result of its shape. It is marked Western Electric Canada 633a. It is mounted on a matching desk stand as used by police radio dispatchers which is marked: Marsland Engineering Limited, Made in Canada.

2050 UNUSUAL 'WARDS' MOBILE MICROPHONE AMPLIFIER. Circa 1940s.(38KB) I photographed this unusual mobile microphone amplifier at a hamfest in Pennsylvania. It uses a pair of dynamotor converters to change the 6 volts DC input to the 300 volts needed by the 6L6 power amplifier tubes.

9050 MILITARY WORLD WAR-II T-9 HAND MICROPHONE Circa 1945.(9KB)

9300 RFT Microphone by Neumann:(25KB) This is a hard to find German condenser microphone with three tubes and a Neumann element. The connector and the base are particularly difficult to find as aret the original boxes shown below.
9300a RFT Microphone and closed boxes:(32KB)
9300b RFT Microphone and open boxes:(28KB)
9300c Another view of the RFT Microphone:(32KB)

9310 RFT Microphone by Neumann:(19KB) This is a hard to find German condenser microphone with three tubes and a Neumann M7 element. The connector and the base are particularly difficult to find as are the original boxes shown below.
9310a RFT Microphone parts and box:(41KB)
9310b Closeup of RFT Microphone M7 Element:(23KB)


4. RADIO MICROPHONES: ( 1950's - Present )

9500 NEUMANN U-47 CONDENSER MICROPHONE:(42KB)This is a very popular microphone and at least one current singer has a pair of them which she uses for all her recording sessions. The microphone is shown with its power supply and cable.

9505 NEUMANN U-47 CONDENSER MICROPHONE:(28KB)This is another Neumann U-47 condenser microphone similar to the one above.

9550 NEUMANN CONDENSER MICROPHONE:(12KB) This is another fine Neumann condenser microphone.

9600 BEYER M 19B. number 75 DYNAMIC MICROPHONE:(26KB)This high quality dynamic microphone was made by Beyer in Berlin.

9610 BEYER M 19B. NUMBER 27 DYNAMIC MICROPHONE:(28KB)This high quality dynamic microphone was made by Beyer in Berlin.

9680 HIGH QUALITY BRITISH MINIATURE BROADCAST MIXER FOR USE WITH NEUMANN MICROPHONES:(25KB)This is a very high quality mixer used for field recordings with Neumann condenser microphones. It is called the 'SQN' (Sine Qua Non) and manufactured by a company on the Isle of Man in the United Kingdom. It is widely used as an ENG television audio mixer.

9800 MODIFIED MICS: Specially Modified Harmonica Microphones by Luke Boggess:(15KB)
Mr. Boggess modifies classic "bullet" microphones for use by harmonica players. He mounts a gain control and a Cannon plug directly on the classic microphone, making it ideal for hand-held use by harmonica players. He also repairs microphones.
Email address:lboggess@yahoo.com

9850 NOVELTY TRANSISTORIZED RADIO - MICROPHONE:(8KB) This microphone is a copy of the RCA model 74 which is also called the Model 44 Junior. It is actually not a microphone at all but a transistorized AM-FM radio. When the radio is turned on, the sign on top of the microphone lights up.
9850a Another closer view of the radio-microphone:(16KB)
9850b Another closer view of the radio-microphone:(14KB)


5. MISCELANEOUS MICROPHONE - RELATED EXHIBITS:

9900 THE ''JIM WEBB'' MICROPHONE COLLECTION: (254KB!) Jim Webb has spent over 20 years collecting over 200 rare microphones shown in this photograph. He may be contacted at: Jim Webb, 15117 Hamlin Street, Van Nuys, CA 91411. (818) 769-6738

9950 THE "NBC" RCA 4 A-1 MICROPHONE THAT GOT AWAY:(47KB) I found this early NBC broadcast microphone in a box in a garage. The bidding went much too high for me to be able to buy it but the picture is nice to look at.


6. REFERENCES

Paquette, Bob. (1989). Early Microphone History. In The AWA Review. 
     Volume 4, pages 131-156.  Published by 
     The Antique Wireless Association, Holcomb, NY 14469.

Paquette, Bob. (1999). The History of the Microphone.
     Published by Bob Paquette.


7. POSSIBLE PLACES TO HAVE MICROPHONES REPAIRED AND RE-RIBBONED:

(PLEASE NOTE: I have not checked out any of these links. They are simply offered for your possible use.

http://www.wesdooley.com
http://www.silviaclassics.com
http://www.thuntek.net/~bk11/bk11.htm
http://www.bigdmc.com/MIC-PARTS.htm
http://enakmic.com/


NOTE: More microphones will be added as soon as possible.


NOTE: I AM ALWAYS LOOKING TO BUY OR TRADE TELEGRAPH KEYS !


Professor Tom Perera
Montclair State University

Internet On-Line Telegraph & Scientific Instrument Museum:
http://w1tp.com
or:
http://www.chss.montclair.edu/~pererat/telegrap.htm
Internet ENIGMA Museum: http://w1tp.com/enigma